A photo of the printed Kitchener Stitch instructions below two balls of yarn

Kitchener Stitch

The Kitchener Stitch (a form of grafting) is a technique used to invisibly join two live edges of knitting, such as the toes of socks, or the two ends of a cowl that was knitted flat.

Throughout the process, it’s better to keep your tension too loose than too tight. You can fine-tune your tension after you’re done so that it matches the tension of the rest of the project!

Click here to download the printable version of the instructions!

1. Setup:

Arrange half the stitches on the front needle and half on the back. Make sure your working yarn is coming from the right hand side of the back needle. Cut a tail approximately three times as long as the seam you’re working, and thread the tail onto a tapestry needle.

2. Continuing Setup:

a) Insert tapestry needle purlwise into first stitch on front needle. Pull yarn through, leaving stitch on needle.
b) Insert tapestry needle knitwise into first stitch on back needle. Pull yarn through, leaving stitch on needle.

3. Main:

a) Insert tapestry needle knitwise into first stitch on front needle.
b) Remove stitch from needle and pull yarn through.
c) Insert tapestry needle purlwise into next stitch on front needle. Pull yarn through, leaving stitch on needle.

d) Insert tapestry needle purlwise into first stitch on back needle.
e) Remove stitch from needle and pull yarn through.
f) Insert tapestry needle knitwise into next stitch on back needle. Pull yarn through, leaving stitch on needle.
Repeat steps 3a through 3f until only 2 stitches remain.

Last two stitches:

Insert tapestry needle knitwise into remaining stitch on front needle. Pull yarn through and remove stitch from needle. Insert tapestry needle purlwise into remaining stitch on back needle. Pull yarn through and remove stitch from needle

Once all stitches have been worked, pull gently on your working yarn to tighten the graft. On longer sections you may tighten your graft after every four stitches or so. Don’t overtighten, just try to match your project’s tension. The graft should look like a row of knit stitches!

Download your copy of the printable Kitchener Stitch Cheat Sheet!

That’s all there is to it! Do you like the Kitchener Stitch? I know a lot of people don’t enjoy it, but I don’t mind it, and I really love the results! 🙂

~Sarah

Pinnable image for the Kitchener Stitch tutorial. Shows blue yarn at the first step of the kitchener stitch